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Drywood Termites

       


From Their House to Yours

Termites tunnel from their home in the soil in a constant search for wood to eat. But they can’t tell the difference between a dead tree and your house. If they come across your home’s foundation while foraging, they’ll follow any cracks or crevices into your home. They may even enter through wood in contact with the soil or by building pencil-sized mud tunnels from ground levels to where the house’s wood frame begins.
Termites can also enter your home through expansion joints, and utility and plumbing openings in the foundation. And they are small – all they need is an opening 1/32-inch wide to squeeze into your home.
Chances are, you won’t actually see termites or a termite swarm, which lasts less than an hour. More likely, you’ll see evidence of swarming – sudden appearance of winged termites; piles of small, lacey wings; or mud tunnels termites build.
Under ideal conditions, a typical termite colony with 250,000 workers can eat about 20 feet of a 2 x 4 board per year. If you find evidence of an infestation, there’s no need to panic. It’s unlikely the damage will get much worse from the time you first discover termites to the time your home is treated. Still, stopping the destruction sooner rather than later is important to avoid costly damage and repairs.

Drywood Termite Behavior
Drywood termites are found in historic homes, trees, boats, antiques & homes along the coast lines. Drywood termites typically do not infest wood unless it is 10 years or older. Drywood termites can be brought into a structure by furniture. Drywood termites behavior is completely different than Subterranean termites. They typically don't have to come in contact to detect than a Subterranean termite. Typically they are noticed by finding fecal pellets (coffee grind looking materials) that is scattered. Their damage is entirely different than damage caused by Subterranean termites. These termites cut across the grain of the wood, excavating large gallery's that connect together on the inside of the wood. the gallerys look very clean & look like they have been sandpapered. They enter the wood by a crack or crevice then bore into the wood. This can be a crack in the wood itself or may be the joint between 2 pieces of wood or space underneath roofing paper.

A. Drywood Termites
Drywood termites live, feed, and nest in undecayed wood which is very low in moisture content. Unlike subterranean termites they do not require any contact with the soil in order to live. They can seriously damage moveable wooden objects such as furniture. In the United States drywood termites are found in narrow strip from Virginia south to Florida, along the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico to northern California on the Pacific coast.
Damage done by drywood termites is entirely different from that caused by subterranean termites. These termites cut across the grain of the wood, excavating large chambers, which are connected by small tunnels. These chambers are kept clean. It looks like they have been sandpapered. They enter the wood from a crack or crevice then bore into the wood. This can be a crack in the wood itself or may be the joint between 2 pieces of wood or space underneath roofing paper.
With their ability to live in wood without soil contact, drywood termites are frequently carried in infested furniture and other wooden objects into other areas.
2. Identification of Subterranean and Drywood Termites
A. Winged Termites
Drywood termites have wings with three or more pigmented veins. Subterranean termites have wings with only 2 pigmented veins.
B. Soldier Termites
Drywood soldiers have teeth on the mandibles. Subterranean termite soldiers have mandibles without teeth.
C. Type of Frass
Subterranean termites have muddy frass that is left in the gallerys. Drywood termite’s frass is a pellet. These pellets are hard and have six distinct concave surfaces on the sides.

Drywood termites live, feed, and nest in undecayed wood which is very low in moisture content. Unlike subterranean termites they do not require any contact with the soil in order to live. They can seriously damage moveable wooden objects such as furniture. In the United States drywood termites are found in narrow strip from Virginia south to Florida, along the Gulf of Mexico and Mexico to northern California on the Pacific coast.
Damage done by drywood termites is entirely different from that caused by subterranean termites. These termites cut across the grain of the wood, excavating large chambers, which are connected by small tunnels. These chambers are kept clean. It looks like they have been sandpapered. They enter the wood from a crack or crevice then bore into the wood. This can be a crack in the wood itself or may be the joint between 2 pieces of wood or space underneath roofing paper.
With their ability to live in wood without soil contact, drywood termites are frequently carried in infested furniture and other wooden objects into other areas.

Drywood Termite Behavior
Drywood termites are found in historic homes, trees, boats, antiques & homes along the coast lines. Drywood termites typically do not infest wood unless it is 10 years or older. Drywood termites can be brought into a structure by furniture. Drywood termites behavior is completely different than Subterranean termites. They typically don't have to come in contact to detect than a Subterranean termite. Typically they are noticed by finding fecal pellets (coffee grind looking materials) that is scattered. Their damage is entirely different than damage caused by Subterranean termites. These termites cut across the grain of the wood, excavating large gallery's that connect together on the inside of the wood. the gallerys look very clean & look like they have been sandpapered. They enter the wood by a crack or crevice then bore into the wood. This can be a crack in the wood itself or may be the joint between 2 pieces of wood or space underneath roofing paper.